Last week, I discussed the fact that guides don’t tell us what to do; they’re with us to help us make our own decisions and own our inner power. So I wanted to give you an example of what happens when I ask my guides to tell me what to do. This is what happened when I asked my guide Shiva how I should write this blog post.

Me: “According to my editorial calendar, this week’s blog is supposed to be about how you guys help me figure out my life.”

Shiva: “Yes, that is what you had decided you would write about.”

Me: “Okay. So how do I do that? What do I say?”

Shiva: “How would you like to do it?”

Me: “I don’t know. That’s why I’m asking you. This is about you and the others; you could give me some help here.”

Shiva: “That is what I’m attempting to do. Given that the topic is tied to the concept that we do not tell humans how to live their lives, do you truly believe it would be beneficial or likely that I would tell you how to write this post?”

(I’m stubborn and was feeling frustrated, so it took me a moment to wrangle my annoyance under control and answer him.)

Me: “Okay. Can you at least help me come up with some possibilities for how to write this? I have the topic but I’m kind of stuck here. Maybe I just haven’t had enough coffee.”

Shiva: “Or perhaps this is an illustration of the concept you wished to discuss. What is your topic?”

Me: “How you and my other guides help me figure out my life.”

Shiva: “And writing this blog is part of your life, correct?”

Me: “Yes.”

Shiva: “I believe your intention in writing this is to demonstrate what you wrote about previously, that guides assist rather than commanding. Is that correct?”

Me (starting to see where he’s going with this): “Yes, that’s correct. So you’re saying that’s what you’re doing right now, and I could just write this conversation?”

Shiva: “That is one option, yes.” 

Me: “This isn’t really a big life thing, though.”

Shiva: “Does it need to be? Or are you simply looking for a way to illustrate the principles about which you have written previously?”

Me: “I guess it could be this. It’s about giving an example. And some of the things I ask you guys’s advice about aren’t things I would want to share in a blog.”

Shiva: “Then have we answered your question?”

Me: “Yeah, I think so. I can just write this conversation.”

Shiva: “Is that what you wish to do?”

Me: “If it’s okay with you, yes.”

Shiva: “I have no objection. I am pleased that you were able to reach a conclusion.”

Me (slightly snarkily, which amused Shiva): “Yeah, thanks.”

 

That’s a long conversation that could have been greatly shortened if Shiva had just given me an idea or a suggestion in the first place, but then I wouldn’t have been using my own brain. I would have been doing what he said, not necessarily what I would have chosen on my own.

It can be irritating sometimes when my guides refuse to give me direct answers and flat out tell me what to do. Fortunately, they don’t get irritated when I do; they understand that humans are conditioned to want the answers given to them, and sometimes we get a little pissy when we have to think for ourselves. They’re patient, and they hang in there with me while I navigate my resistance to giving the “wrong answer” or making a mistake. And ultimately, I gain more power and confidence because I choose for myself, while still feeling supported because they are talking me through the process.